Tagged: MLB Draft

How to make the MLB Draft Better

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If you’re like me, you eagerly wait for the MLB draft the same way that a kid would wait for the last day of school. Then again, you’re probably not me, Heck, you probably didn’t realize the MLB Draft was a thing unless you have a subscription to Baseball America, read MLB Pipeline, or read Minor League Madhouse (Yeah, I know, self-plug, haha.) It’s kind of disappointing, really. How is it that everyone knows about the NFL Draft and the NBA Draft, but the MLB Draft is pretty much the equivalent of the chess club? Well maybe it’s because there are a couple issues that prevent the draft from getting the visibility it deserves.

First of all, the MLB Draft is the only draft that takes place during the season as opposed to the offseason. You know why the NFL Draft has so much coverage? Because it is the most exciting event for fans until the season starts. The same thing goes for the NBA Draft. Sure you have free agency, but you also have the NBA draft. The fact that the MLB draft coincides with the season, heck, it even goes on while games are being played, makes it one of the most overlooked drafts in pro sports.

Another problem is that the players that are available to be picked don’t have the same athletic profile as an NFL or an NBA prospect. People know these names because they see them on ESPN or the other sports networks all the time. I can guarantee you Dansby Swanson made it on ESPN about a third of the time that Jameis Winston or Karl Towns did. And it gets even worse if you are a high schooler because of the fact that the majority of high school games are not televised by national networks. If you want to see Jason Groome pitch so you can see the future, check YouTube or make a trip down to Barnegat, New Jersey, because the chances you see him on national TV right now are almost none.

The third problem is that whereas NFL, NBA, and in some cases, NHL talent have a good shot at making the jump to the pros immediately, in baseball, it’s rare to see that happen. Because it can take an average of three years to see a first round pick make the majors, the interest is not there unless the fans are made aware of the hotshot prospect. Sure, JP Crawford is supposed to be the next Jimmy Rollins in Philadelphia, but let me ask you, Phillies fans, how many times have you seen Crawford play live? And no, the Futures game does not count. Additionally, there is the chance that a first round pick does not make the majors, making the MLB Draft one of the biggest risks involving amateur talent. In the 50 years the draft has been held, no class has had every first rounder make the majors.

While there is no way to guarantee the success of the draft, there is always a way to drum up more interest in the event itself. So how exactly is that done? Well, here are some ideas that could get the ball rolling.

1. Televise more college and high school games on MLB Network and other channels.

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If you want to get people interested in prospects, the best way to do so is to give the prospects more visibility. Sure, ESPNU will televise a college game every now and again, and the regional networks will do as well, but they play to a niche audience. And when ESPN, ESPN 2 and ESPN U do cover college baseball regularly, it’s usually after players are drafted, when the NCAA tournament is going on.  By getting more networks involved before the fact, especially the national networks and the sports networks, there should be at least a slight bump in interest. Play it like college football does and have college baseball games on in the morning and afternoon on CBS and ABC. Show highlights on SportsCenter, and not just the occasional Top 10 Play, make sure that baseball fans know the future of baseball. Heck, if possible, drum up interest early by showing summer league games on ESPN 2. The possibilities are endless.

As far as high school, perhaps there should be more games available to stream online. If MLB.com were to offer a service to allow fans to watch games that high level prospects pitch in, then you can guarantee fans will watch it. Reading about high school prospects is the equivalent of hearing a folk legend, people rarely get to see what these players are unless there is video footage. By highlighting the top prep players in each draft class through a stream, fans will be able to see what guys like Riley Pint or Jason Groome or Blake Rutherford actually are.

Come to think of it, if ESPN and MLB Network both decided to air the MLB draft, I’m sure there would be a major viewership spike.

Watching games may be a fun way to see the talent that does come up, but there’s more to evaluating players than seeing them perform, which brings me to my next point…

2. Create an MLB Scouting Combine.

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Believe it or not, this was proposed as an idea last year in the wake of the Brady Aiken saga, and it may be the only time that prep and college players get to be evaluated side by side. The idea that players can have certain measurable categories that can be evaluated against other players in the same vacuum allows for a more open approach to scouting. Additionally, if medical tests are included, teams are not left in the dark about records, and open communication between players, agents, and teams is encouraged. The other fun in it would be seeing who would be the “workout warriors” of the combine, which players would see their stock rise enough to jump them into the first round. Sure, players do see their stock rise during their seasons, but it’s not as fun to watch as seeing Aaron Donald completely defy expectations.

Now there is a certain timing issue that may lead to the question of when the combine could be scheduled, and with the MLB Draft already competing with the NCAA Tournament and the MLB season. This brings up my next point…

3. Move the draft (and possible combine) to the end of June/early July.

College coaches’ biggest complaint about the MLB draft is that it’s scheduled during the tournament, meaning that players could get distracted by all the hype that comes with being selected. Sure, it’s nice to have a celebration with your teammates like Dansby Swanson and Walker Buehler did last year, but to be honest, wouldn’t it be better to have the draft right after the College World Series? With all the distraction behind them, players can focus on the future, and teams will be able to gather more information on the players as they go through the College World Series.

Of course, one of the main issues with this is that a month of negotiating time for contracts would be cut, and considering the fact that there are over 1200 players chosen in the draft, and teams do try and sign each player, there would have to be some quick negotiations done in order to get all players in a draft class accounted for. Considering teams want to get players in the system as soon as possible, it’s reasonable that they possibly just send their draft picks to extended spring training, and then if they feel they are ready, add them to a low level part of the organization.

Now how about the actual draft? How do we make more people watch it?

1. Give the draft its own day. 

Now when I say the draft, I mean the rounds that are televised. No, we don’t need to do 40 rounds in one sitting.

Part of the problem with the way the draft is scheduled is that nobody really sees it, what with the competition being baseball games. By having there be a day off, you can bet more people would consider tuning in to watch the draft. In fact, encourage people to watch the draft by printing it on team schedules. In fact, promote it heavily, after all, this is the future of baseball that people should be seeing.

2. Invite fans to see it live.

Part of the reason why the NFL, NBA, and NHL drafts are so successful is because they encourage fans to attend the draft in person. And that’s why you see so many hardcore fans dressed up in their team colors, cheering for their team’s picks. The MLB draft, on the other hand, is almost like that exclusive party that very few people are invited to. It’s just the draft attendees and their families, the MLB Network personalities, the team representatives, the Commissioner, and maybe a few special guests. If you want to promote the future, don’t make it a stuffy cocktail party, make it an open experience. I’m sure there are plenty of fans that would give anything to sit in the left field seats at Studio 42 to watch players walk on stage and receive the jersey and handshake from Rob Manfred.

In fact, why restrict the location to Studio 42? Why not move the draft to a ballroom and set it up like Studio 42? Or even better? Have the draft at an actual MLB Ballpark, like Yankee Stadium, Citi Field, Wrigley Field or Fenway Park? If the NBA can have their draft at the Barclays Center every year, and the NHL can move their draft to whatever NHL Arena it is in every year, why restrict the MLB Draft to Secaucus, New Jersey? And speaking of invites…

3. Invite more college players.

NEW YORK, NY - JUNE 6:  (L-R) Clint Frazier, Dominic Smith, Tim Anderson, Nicholas Ciuffo, Billy McKinney, J.P. Crawford, Aaron Judge, and Ian Clarkin pose for a group photo during the 2013 First-Year Player Draft at MLB Network's Studio 42 on June 6, 2013 in Secaucus, New Jersey. (Photo by Paige Calamari/MLB Photos via Getty Images)

This one is admittedly tricky and relies on a few scenarios to break the right way, but in my opinion, the MLB draft would get even more viewership if more college players were able to attend. Ever since the draft has been televised, very few college players have been able to attend. To prove my point, here are all the players that have attended the MLB draft in person since it started being televised in 2007:

2007: Josh Vitters (HS), Philippe Aumont (HS), Ross Detweiler (HS)

2008: Aaron Hicks (HS)

2009: Mike Trout (HS)

2011: Larry Greene (HS)

2012: Carlos Correa (HS), Andrew Heaney (NCAA), Gavin Cecchini (HS), Courtney Hawkins (HS), Clint Coulter (HS)

2013: Clint Frazier (HS), Dominic Smith (HS), Tim Anderson (JUCO), Nick Ciuffo (HS), Billy McKinney (HS), JP Crawford (HS), Aaron Judge (NCAA), Ian Clarkin (HS), Jon Denney (HS)

2014:  Nick Gordon (HS), Michael Chavis (HS), Jake Gatewood (HS), Monte Harrison (HS), Derek Hill (HS), Grant Holmes (HS), Kodi Medeiros (HS)

2015: Brendan Rodgers (HS), Ashe Russell (HS), Garrett Whitley (HS), Mike Nikorak (HS)

So out of 31 players that have attended, two have come out of college, or a little over six percent. Now of course, there is a logical reason, considering the fact that the draft and the NCAA tournament conflict with each other, and the best chance to be at the draft is if your team does not qualify for the tournament. So going back to those factors that break, in the best case scenario, what could happen is that if the draft is moved, more collegians could be invited. In the worst case, that is, the draft isn’t moved, the collegians from the smaller schools, like Kyle Lewis or Matt Crohan, would get the invite.

If more collegians are invited, there is a possibility that more fans will be willing to watch, as these are the players that have the best chance to be seen. The question is which collegians would be able to come?

4. Let teams trade picks.

The MLB draft is the only draft of the Big 4 sports leagues that doesn’t allow trading of draft picks. Well, technically they do, but the picks that can be traded are only competitive balance lottery picks. The lack of trading means there’s almost no reason to be excited for the draft, especially if a team has no first round pick at all. And in some cases, it can be a real disadvantage. A team with a terrible minor league system who is this close to contention would greatly benefit if they were allowed to trade draft picks, and the draft would be even more interesting if, say, the Yankees were allowed to trade up.

While only a couple trades have been made with CB picks involved, the opportunity to expand that to, say, maybe the first 5 rounds of draft picks would make for a more interesting show. Imagine if a team is willing to offer a major league caliber star prospect in exchange for a high pick, or if teams trade picks in order to move up or down. Instead of just waiting for players to be picked, it would be a lot more fun to watch.

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While these changes aren’t going to come around that quickly, if at all, it still should send a message. The future of baseball is just as important as the past and present. If the draft is given the exposure that it should get, then more fans will be willing to watch it and see what the future holds for their team.

Who Is This Year’s Highly Anticipated Prep Shortstop?

 

For the past four years, there has been one common occurrence in the MLB draft: That occurrence is the Highly Anticipated Prep Shortstop (or HAPS, for short). The common characteristics is that the shortstop in question is (obviously) a high schooler, has the potential to make the majors in three years instead of the traditional four or five years, is a top prospect usually by the end of his first year or the middle of his second, and garners a lot of praise from opposing scouts.

The past four years of HAPS are as follows:

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2013: JP Crawford, Phillies

While it’s still too early to be determined, Crawford had been highly visible throughout his high school career, and when he was drafted, it was to a team that was looking to replace a legendary shortstop with a newer model. Crawford’s first minor league season saw him completely own the Gulf Coast League and skip entirely over short ball in favor of the more advanced Low A. Crawford also ended the season as the #4 prospect in Philly’s system, behind only Roman Quinn, a fellow prep shortstop drafted in the 2nd round of the 2011 draft, as well as 3B Maikel Franco and P Jesse Biddle, who have made the 2014 top 100 list on MLB.com. Even though Crawford effectively was a HAPS by default, as last year’s middle infield class was very weak, Crawford has at least proven that he is still a very solid lock to follow the progression that fellow HAPS have gone through.

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2012: Carlos Correa, Astros, and Addison Russell, Athletics.

Thanks to what could have been regarded as one of the best prep shortstop draft classes in baseball history, 2012 had not one, but two HAPS propects. Carlos Correa, who was the first overall pick, drew some attention at the end of his debut year, but in his second year, he justified why he was a first overall pick. After having a monster season for the Quad Cities River Bandits, Correa was rewarded by being voted in to the 2013 Futures game World Roster, as well as being named the Astros’ top prospect by the end of the season. At the start of the 2014 season Correa was named the top prospect in the Astros’ system again, ahead of such players as Mark Appel, Jonathan Singleton, and Lance McCullers, and was also named the #8 prospect in all of baseball.

Russell, who I’ve consistently noted was the catalyst for the death of Moneyball drafting in Oakland, has done nothing but impress in his first two years. Named the best prospect in Oakland’s system immediately after the 2012 season, Russell again went on a tear at Single-A Stockton, and was also selected for the Futures game as a member of Team USA. Russell ended the season in AAA Sacramento, completely jumping over AA, and although he obviously had issues handling the rapid increase in competition level, the prevailing theory is that Russell could be in the majors by the end of the 2014 season.

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2011: Francisco Lindor, Indians

The Indians have repeatedly stated that they do not intend to rush Lindor to the major leagues, to which I call bull. Lindor has been nothing short of amazing ever since he stepped on the field. At the end of the 2012 season, his first full season in minor league ball, Lindor had established himself as a #1 shortstop prospect, the #1 Indians prospect, and the #13 prospect in baseball. This included an invite to the Futures game in Kansas City, where he played for the World Team. Lindor followed up his great 2012 with an even better 2013 where he went through two levels of ball, topping out in Double-A, and once again being invited to the Futures Game in New York. He once again ended the season as the top shortstop prospect, the top Indians prospect, but increased his overall prospect ranking to #5. At the beginning of this season, Lindor has already established himself as a top ten prospect yet again, however, he dropped his shortstop ranking to #4, perfectly reasonable given his competition was Xander Bogaerts, Correa, and Javier Baez, who has started to put himself in the HAPS conversation, especially after showing a dominant power swing in Spring Training. The reason why Baez isn’t in it right now is that while he’s advanced at the same rate as Lindor, he hasn’t had Lindor’s wow factor. Still, if Baez can be as consistently impressive as Lindor has been, he could put himself in the HAPS conversation.

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2010: Manny Machado, Orioles

The man who started it all, Machado blazed through the minors, made his major league debut a mere two years after being drafted, and made his first All-star team in 2013. While Machado’s best season ended on a sour note after he broke his leg, he has definitely entered his name into the elite infielder category. I know that Machado technically is a third baseman now, but in truth I’m grading him as a shortstop because of his A-Rod like conversion to third. And to continue, Machado was a shortstop when he was drafted, and only played a few games at third base in the minors, in Double-A Bowie, which incidentally was his last minor league stop before he made his debut. Will Machado ever move back to shortstop? Maybe, maybe not, but regardless, Machado is still one of the best young players right now.

The 2014 draft isn’t until June, but that doesn’t mean there’s no room for early speculation. In what is considered yet another meh prep middle infield class, there are only two definitive first round prep shortstop talents, one of which has equal value as a pitcher. The two shortstops in question are Clovis High School’s Jacob Gatewood, and Olympia High School’s Nick Gordon.

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Gatewood, like Crawford before him, has had eyes on him since last year. A well rounded guy with an emphasis on power who draws comparisons to Troy Tulowitzki and Starlin Castro, Gatewood, barring a bad senior season has the projectability to be a top ten pick, and could raise his stock to top five, maybe even top three if he continues to play at the level he has. In my initial mock, I had him going to Colorado as a potential replacement for Troy Tulowitzski, whom I feel will leave Colorado before 2020. In the thin air of Colorado, Gatewood would thrive despite the humidor baseballs, and he would have the potential to be a Machado-like talent.

Gordon has a baseball pedigree thanks to his father and brother, Tom and Dee. He has project ability as both a pitcher and a shortstop, but scouts have said that Gordon will stick to shortstop. While not as dominant at Gatewood, Gordon is still a top 20 prospect who could actually outperform his brother. I had Gordon going to San Diego. In theory, if Everth Cabrera can’t get back to his pre-Biogenesis self, it’s a possibility that the Padres will try and look for a replacement in the coming years. Gordon would benefit from the expansive park in San Diego, as he thrives on being a slap hitter with speed, much like Cabrera was.

Between Gatewood and Gordon, my belief  is that the former makes the best case for the HAPS of 2014. He certainly has made a name for himself starting last year, and he has a legitimate shot to become one of the best shortstops in the post-Jeter and Rollins shortstop era. His power is not to be ignored, and if he signs early and tears it up in rookie or short ball, he could find himself in the top 100, maybe even top 25 very early in his career.

#14

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Well, after a month of activity in which my biggest contribution was mock drafting, my efforts have paid off, as MLBlogs (finally) released their monthly honors list. And guess who made the biggest jump in the fan blogs?

Yes. Prospects2Pros leapfrogged 33 spots to the number 14 spot, and in doing so, garnered the attention of the MLblogging community. Being featured in other websites boosted my view count, and being considered a draft expert on the main page didn’t hurt either. Needless to say, it’s good to be in the top fifteen.

Here’s a highlight of what will be happening for the rest of June: I will be finishing up the draft grades for the remaining five divisions. Afterwards, I will do a retrospection of a certain draft which I will pick myself, and highlight the importance of that draft.

Until then, see you around.

Draft Grades: NL East

We continue our post-draft coverage by grading each team’s draft, going division by division, starting off with the NL East. Each team’s first pick will be highlighted, as well as four other prospects that have caught my eye. I will analyze, then offer a final statement and grade on each team’s draft.

Atlanta Braves: 

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First Pick: Jason Hursh, Pitcher, Oklahoma State (pick 31)

Other Notable Picks:

Victor Caratini, Catcher, Miami Dade CC (65)

Kyle Wren, CF, Georgia Tech (253)

Stephen Wrenn, OF, Walton High School, Georgia (853)

Jacob Heyward, RF, Eagles Landing Christian Academy, Georgia (1153)

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Atlanta’s decision to add a collegiate pitcher in Jason Hursh is a make-or-break pick here. While Hursh is armed with a mid 90’s fastball, he did come off of Tommy John surgery, which is common among this batch of Atlanta Braves hurlers. Still, Oklahoma State is starting to shy away from its hitter image in favor of becoming a pitching farm.

Victor Caratini, the JuCo catcher, could be a solid defensive asset who can play many positions. While his primary position is catcher, he can play third base, a position that is being temporarily held by Chris Johnson.

The Braves did find an intriguing trio of outfielders from Georgia, in Kyle Wren, who is GM Frank Wren’s son, Stephen Wrenn, who came from the same Georgia prep system as Austin Meadows and Clint Frazier, and Jacob Heyward, the brother of current Braves star Jason Heyward. While it is unlikely that Wrenn and Heyward will sign, Wren could find himself as a solid backup in the Braves organization.

Overall, Atlanta’s draft wasn’t exactly littered with high profile talent, and with the team giving up their first round pick to sign the slumbering giant that is BJ Upton, it doesn’t look like this draft will pay off for them. Hursh may find himself on the Braves’ pitching staff as early as 2015, but aside from that, nothing special

Grade: C-

Miami Marlins:

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First Pick: Colin Moran, 3B, North Carolina (6)

Other Notable Picks:

Matt Krook, Pitcher, St. Ignatius College Prep, California (35)

Trevor Williams, Pitcher, Arizona State (44)

Colby Suggs, Pitcher, Arkansas (73)

Chad Wallach, Catcher, Cal State Fullerton (142)

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Nobody expected Colin Moran to go to Miami at #6, especially with New Mexico first baseman DJ Peterson on the board, but Miami pulled it off. Moran, the nephew of BJ Surhoff, a former first overall pick, has the bat and the glove to be a solid contributor, if not a superstar, for the Marlins once they reach pinnacle mode again.

Matt Krook is an intriguing high school arm. A lefty with low to mid 90’s speed, he’s not exactly a big stamina guy, but his size and arm slot have drawn favorable reviews from scouts. Krook will take years to develop, provided he signs, but if he makes it through the system, he could be the next big Marlins pitcher, after Josh Beckett, Josh Johnson, and Jose Fernandez.

The Marlins grabbed some relief pitching that could contribute early in Trevor Williams and Colby Suggs. Williams profiles as a contact pitcher who will miss a few bats occasionally, while Suggs, who served as Arkansas’ closer, could do some major damage in terms of his pitches. Suggs could end up as a September call-up, while waiting maybe three years to become the permanent closer.

Tim Wallach, a former All-American, first round pick, Gold Glove winner, and Silver Slugger, must have been proud when his son Chad was drafted. The younger Wallach has some hitting ability combined with solid defensive skills. He may not be a starter like his dad, but could find himself as a dependable backup in the future, especially if Rob Brantly goes and Kyle Skipworth still hasn’t panned out.

Miami’s draft was littered with big names and possible contributors. Moran’s ceiling indicates that he could be another Dustin Ackley or David Wright, while his floor indicates he could be like his uncle. Pitching was a must-need in Miami and most of their picks were used to bolster a system that could use a few more good arms. Judging by the talent that is coming in, this could serve to be one of the best drafts the Marlins have in a long time.

Grade: A

New York Mets 

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First Pick: Dominic Smith, 1B, Serra High School, California (11)

Other Notable picks:

Andrew Church, Pitcher, Basic High School, Nevada (48)

Ivan Wilson, OF, Ruston High School, Louisiana (76)

LJ Mazzilli, 2B, Uconn, (116)

Jared King, OF, Kansas State (146)

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In the weeks leading up to the draft, the speculation was that Sandy Alderson was finally going to address the outfield problem with the first pick he had. Turns out that was not it at all, as first baseman Dominic Smith was picked instead. Smith, while not an outfielder, was regarded as one of the best prep hitters in the draft, some would say better than the two Georgia outfielders that were taken before him. Smith, who was drafted because he was the best player available, will not be ready until 2017, but when he is, Ike Davis, who has yet to show that he is over his disastrous 2012 start, will likely be moved.


Alderson pulled another shocker when he took Nevada prepster Andrew Church in the second round. The pick was clearly based on potential, as Church hasn’t played a full season of baseball since his freshman season, and spent his high school career on three different teams, including one where he had an argument with his team’s coach. Church’s potential should be monitored, as he has the tools to be a mid-rotation arm, but he may honor his commitment to the University of San Diego in order to build up his resume and be picked three years later.

The outfield help came in the third round, as the Mets used their compensation pick from the loss of Teddy Stankiewicz to draft Ruston High School outfielder Ivan Wilson. Wilson has projectable power, but is somewhat raw and still needs to develop more if he wants to be part of the Mets outfield in the future.

A familiar name came to the Mets in the fourth round when the team drafted former first rounder Lee Mazzilli’s son, LJ. LJ is a mold of Daniel Murphy, as a hitter with little power but able to spray to all fields. He could probably find himself in a Justin Turner type role as early as 2014, but he won’t get as much playing time as his father, as long as Murphy holds his own at second base.

Probably the fastest player in the Mets 2013 draft class to make the majors could be Kansas State outfielder Jared King. King won’t be joining the team until Kansas State is finished with their season, and with the Wildcats on the verge of making the journey to Omaha, that will be a while. Still, King was drafted as a hitter as his ability as a contact and power hitter have shown, and given the team’s horrendous outfield situation, it wouldn’t be a surprise if he makes the Mets as early as 2014.

In conclusion, the Mets made some curious choices in Smith and Church, but afterwards, the team started making choices that made some degree of sense. Smith may become another Darryl Strawberry, and King may be a name to be considered in the future. Sandy used his draft to remedy some situations that needed to be fixed. Hopefully it will turn out that he once again has made solid picks.

Grade: B

Philadelphia Phillies: 

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First Pick: JP Crawford, Shortstop, Lakewood High School, California (16)

Other Notable Picks:

Andrew Knapp, Catcher, California (53)

Cord Sandberg OF, Manatee High School, Florida (89)

Trey Williams, 3B, College Of the Canyons (211)

Cavan Biggio, Utility, St. Thomas High School, Texas (871)

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It’s about time the Phillies took a shortstop to replace Jimmy Rollins. The second oldest starting shortstop in the big leagues, (oldest if you don’t count Jeter on the disabled list) will be 35 in November. Thankfully, JP Crawford stood out in a weak middle infield class and should take the reigns as soon as Rollins retires. Crawford is a defensive standout who has some hitting ability and speed. His athleticism was constantly dissected, even months before the draft. Crawford has the chance to continue the tradition of all-star caliber Phillies infielders.

Though there were several other options in terms of prep catchers, Andrew Knapp, the California backstop intrigued Philly the most. While Carlos Ruiz still has plenty of time, Knapp  is a solid hitter, but an excellent defender. It will be interesting to see if he could find himself fighting for the backup, and then possibly the starting role in the future.

Trey Williams stands out as a highly touted infielder who had first round potential.While not drafted as high as he wanted, the CotC third baseman still has talent that could land him in the big leagues in the future, namely his hitting ability.

One of the biggest day 3 surprises in the draft was seeing Cavan Biggio, son of Craig, not go to Houston, like his father did, but rather to Philadelphia. Biggio, who has no set position, yet can hit and run like his father, however, will not sign with the Phillies, instead going to Notre Dame. He could be a future first round pick if it turns out that he finds his position.

The Phillies had their share of surprises, but what I liked about their draft the most was their addressing of a potential future weakness at shortstop. This could help restart the farm system that was once considered the worst in baseball.

Grade: B

Washington Nationals: 

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First Pick: Jake Johansen, Pitcher, Dallas Baptist (68)

Other Notable Picks:

Austin Voth, Pitcher, Washington (166)

Andrew Dunlap, Pitcher, No school, (1006)

Lukas Schiraldi, Pitcher, Navarro College (1066)

Karsten Whitson, Pitcher, Florida (1126)

Jake Johansen comes from the ever present Underdog university that is Dallas Baptist, most famously known for its 2011 Super Regional loss against California, a team that had just been saved from budget cuts. Johansen has the build to be a good pitcher, but still needs a lot of development in order to justify his second round pick label.

Austin Voth may be the best pick the Nationals have made this year, as he carved out a decent resume in the Pac 12. Finishing behind first overall pick Mark Appel in strikeouts, he has a possibly future in Washington’s staff, especially if certain free agent acquisitions fail to work out.

Andrew Dunlap is an anomaly. He did not pitch high school ball last year despite needing the eligibility in order to get a college scholarship, so he spent the season pitching at the same academy that Trevor Bauer used. He has a mid to high 90’s fastball, but if anything, he probably should consider going to college instead of signing with the team.

Lukas Schiraldi is the son of former Mets and Red Sox pitcher Calvin Schiraldi. The younger Schiraldi spent two seasons as a JuCo pitcher where he developed an arsenal of pitches, many of which still need development. It is unlikely that he signs, considering he can improve his draft position at his dad’s alma mater, the University of Texas.

Karsten Whitson’s name is familiar because he was a former first round pick of the San Diego Padres. Whitson has had an up-and -down career at Florida, where he pitched in the College World Series, but this year, he was sidelined due to injury. I doubt that Whitson will accept being drafted this low, so we should see him reenter the draft for the final time, in hopes that he can be a first round pick again.

Washington’s draft was unimpressive from the beginning.  First the team gave up their first round pick for Rafael Soriano, a terrible move in and of itself. Second, tabbing a collegiate project in the second round is a major no-no. Third, there were other big names out there who could contribute. Ultimately, this draft is a failure.

Grade: F

 

Coming up, the NL Central.

2013 MLB Draft: Looking at the top returning picks

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Prospects2Pros has made it very clear that one of the highlights of this blog will be the MLB draft. But with the draft a couple months away, and with college baseball heading into the midpoint of the season, I have decided to take the first of many looks at the draft. To start, I will focus on three players who were already drafted in the first round, but elected to stay in school. 

Today, I began by following a bunch of prospects and draft experts on twitter, among them, former 2nd overall pick Jameson Taillon, and the official MLB draft twitter feed, as well as MLB.com prospect writer Jonathan Mayo, whose rankings serve as the basis of my top 100 prospect mini-profiles. Mayo had sent out a tweet saying that he would be answering questions about the draft, so being the nut that I am, I felt compelled to ask the following question:

Mayo responded rather quickly with this:

Now, unless you are a draft nut like I am, you will have no idea who those two players are, so I will provide some exposition. 

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Karsten Whitson and Dylan Covey are two former first round picks. Whitson was a highly touted arm out of high school, who was taken with the ninth overall pick in the 2010 draft by the San Diego Padres, while Covey also was a highly touted arm who was taken by the Milwaukee Brewers who was drafted in the same year. 

Whitson elected to go to the University of Florida, where he spent the next two years contributing to the continued success of the program, while also contributing to the team’s 2011 College World Series Final appearance, the first one to be held in TD Ameritrade Park Omaha, which had replaced the old Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium. Whitson unfortunately missed the entire 2013 season with shoulder surgery, and, as Mayo stated, is unlikely to be another first round pick. 

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Covey, on the other hand, decided to go to college because of a recent diagnosis of Type 1 diabetes. He then spent the next three years pitching for the University of San Diego Toreros, the same school that former first rounder Brian Matusz attended. As Mayo said, it is uncertain if Covey will be a first round pick. 

Covey and Whitson would cross paths once again, this time pitching in the Cape Cod League for the Orleans Firebirds in 2012, and they would contribute to the team that made the semifinals of the Cape Cod League playoffs. 

The other player who is a former first round draft choice is Stanford ace Mark Appel. Appel famously turned down a lucrative offer from the Pittsburgh Pirates under the advice of his agent, Scott Boras. He is projected to be the first overall pick in the 2013 draft. You may also recall that Appel’s actions caused the Mets to lose out of Michael Bourn, allowing him to sign with the Cleveland Indians 

My general feelings about these three players are that Appel will be taken with the first pick in the draft, and Covey may go as high as the sandwich round, while Whitson decides to wait another year and attempt to challenge NC State pitcher Carlos Rodon and Vanderbilt ace Tyler Beede for the top pick in the draft. We will see how things go until then. 

Pilot Post

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Have you ever noticed how almost all tv series start out with their first episode called “Pilot”? I mean, it’s just called “Pilot”, nothing else. This can be especially frustrating for fans of certain shows, like “The Big Bang Theory”

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which, with the exception of the pilot, has a common theme with their episode titles. But I digress.

If you have come across this site, then either you are a huge fan of baseball prospects, like I am, or you got here by mistake, (although I cannot possibly imagine what you could possibly be looking for that has any similarity to prospects2pros, nor do I wish to think about it.)

The goal of Prospects2Pros is to chronicle the future of Major League baseball. The average baseball career lasts just a little over five and a half years, at least that what was recorded in the last study done by the New York Times, a good six years ago. The career of a baseball player can be looked at like a bell curve. At first, the player needs to earn his spot on the roster, and if he turns out to be good, he is practically assured a spot on the club by the end of Spring Training. But as the years wane, and after a player peaks, the curve goes back down, and once again, said player is going to have to fight for his spot again. And often, it comes down to him and a hotshot prospect. 

How do you think Justin Verlander displaced Jeremy Bonderman as the ace of the Detroit Tigers staff? Was Chipper Jones always the starting third baseman in Atlanta, or did he displace someone, who, like him, was once a hyped young talent? Where do these hot new names come from, and why are they so more appealing then our current assemblage of ballplayers?

As I have stated before, if you have any questions similar to these, then I can be of assistance.

This blog is designed to get people more acquainted with the newest members of their team, the prospects, or as “Uncle Drew” from the Nike commercial likes to call them, “Youngbloods”

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It will not just be written profiles of prospects, but also interviews (if they can be attained), bits from a radio podcast that I also do, coverage of the MLB Draft and other insights.

With that, I officially launch Prospects2Pros, the blog that is obsessively devoted to Baseball Prospects.